Hematology - Regional Cancer Care Associates

Hematology

Regional Cancer Care Associates’ fellowship-trained hematologists have extensive experience in diagnosing and managing cancers of the blood and blood-forming tissues, as well as non-cancerous hematologic conditions, such as various types of anemia, the thalassemias, von Willebrand disease, and other disorders of clotting, polycythemia vera, and others in adult patients. They also serve as investigators in numerous clinical trials, which helps them offer patients access to the latest therapies and treatment strategies.

Cancers of the Blood and Blood-forming Tissues

RCCA’s hematologists treat the following cancerous conditions—and others—in adults:

– Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) – A fast-growing cancer in which the bone marrow produces too many lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell.

– Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) – A fast-growing cancer marked by the production of abnormal myeloblasts (a type of white blood cell), red blood cells, or platelets. This is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults.

– Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) – A slow-growing cancer in which the bone marrow produces an excessive number of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. This form of leukemia most often occurs in middle age or later.

– Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) – A slowly progressing cancer of the blood and bone marrow marked by the production of abnormal myeloblasts (a type of white blood cell), red blood cells, or platelets.

– Hairy Cell Leukemia – A rare type of cancer that gets worse slowly, or not at all, in which the bone marrow produces too many lymphocytes. This form of leukemia is termed “hairy cell” because affected cells look “hairy” under a microscope.

– Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) – A disease in which cancerous cells form in the lymph system, which is part of the body’s immune system. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) often is further categorized as classical and nodular-lymphocyte-predominant, with the classical type including nodular sclerosing HL, mixed cellularity HL, lymphocyte depletion HL, and lymphocyte-rich classical HL.

– Mantle Cell Lymphoma – A fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma marked by small- to medium-size cancer cells that may be found in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, blood, and gastrointestinal system.

– Multiple Myeloma – A form of cancer in which abnormal plasma cells form tumors in bone or soft tissue.

– Myelodysplastic Syndromes/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms – In myelodysplastic syndromes, immature blood cells in the bone marrow do not develop into healthy blood cells. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a disease marked by the bone marrow’s protection of an excessive number of platelets, red blood cells, or certain types of white blood cells.

– Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma – A form of cancer in which malignant cells form in the lymph system, which is part of the body’s immune system. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can either be aggressive or slow-growing in nature.

Non-cancerous Hematologic Conditions

RCCA hematologists provide care to adult patients with the following—and many other—non-cancerous disorders of the blood and blood-forming tissues:

– Anemia – A condition in which the blood has fewer red blood cells than normal. There are many forms of anemia; some of the most common ones are listed below.

– Aplastic – A blood disorder in which the bone marrow does not produce a sufficient number of new blood cells.

– Fanconi anemia – A condition in which the bone marrow does not make a sufficient number of new blood cells. In Fanconi anemia, the marrow also can produce abnormal blood cells.

– Hemophilia – A disorder in which people bleed for a longer time than normal after an injury because they lack a protein needed for normal blood clotting.

– Pernicious anemia – A condition in which the body does not produce a sufficient number of red blood cells because of inadequate levels of vitamin B12.

– Polycythemia vera – A condition in which an excessive number of red blood cells makes blood thicker than normal, slowing circulation, and making it easier for blood clots to form.

– Sickle cell disease – A group of inherited disorders in which affected people have an abnormal form of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen through the body.

– Thalassemias – A group of inherited blood disorders marked by a decreased production of healthy red blood cells and hemoglobin.

– von Willebrand disease – A bleeding disorder caused by low levels or ineffective activity of a protein called von Willebrand factor that helps blood to clot.